104. Beekeeping

D has long talked of keeping bees.

I’m trying to encourage him to retire, yet I’m slightly trepidatious about it. Will I need to entertain him all the time? Or, will he develop/revisit some of his own hobbies and social circles?

To that end, I bought him a starter beehive kit for his birthday. Except, it was a little hard to conceal. When I brought it home, I was all in a tizzy. I had just returned from a couple of days in the city, and had to get the house ready and food shopping done for weekend company. Our nephew carried the kit into my studio, where I thought it would be safe from D’s observation, but when he came home a couple of hours later, he gave our great-nephew a tour of the yard, AND studio, so the surprise was ruined.

He is keen, though, and has read some books, taken a beginner bee-keeping course, talked to our friend who is a beekeeper, and ordered a “nuc” (for “nucleus”), which is a small starter bee colony centered on a queen (of course!.)  “Small” is a relative term; in this case it means 20,000 bees as a full, functioning hive has about 50,000 bees.  In fact, the hive will spend most of the summer growing and will not, as a result, produce much excess honey.  It will need most of its honey for the winter.

The race was on – he needed to build a bee deck to house his first and future hives.

In true Green Life spirit, I noticed a deck demolition going on in our neighbourhood, and thought the lumber being discarded looked re-usable. D picked up a truckload of it, then spent a full day removing nails. What a green hero in Carhartts!carhartt guy reclaiming lumberHe first needed to locate the deck in the yard. An open location that has southern exposure and gets sun almost all day (but has occasional shade) is best, as bees need warmth in the winter and especially in the morning. Even I have noticed that the bees only leave their hives in nice weather.

D built a substantial deck. He never does things by halves. I envisioned insubstantial rebar posts to hold the requisite electric fence. I say requisite, because we have black bears in our neighbourhood, and if you read Winnie The Pooh, you will know that bears LOOOOOVE honey (Bee Fact: it’s actually the embryonic bees – like grubs – that they like.  The honey is their dessert).

But, did I tell you D favours substantial? His bee deck, how can I say this, did not exactly blend in with the environment. I painted it the same green as the house (Behr’s Ponderosa.)  Bee books advise to shoot for “inconspicuous”, just in case neighbours (who are very rarely, if ever, bothered by nearby hives) are nervous.That helps.

D built a stand to perch his hive on, and installed the electric fence. It has about 6,000 volts but fear not; extremely low amperage – touch it and you’ll definitely feel it, but will be unharmed.From our garden shed, I requisitioned a ceramic green plant tray, and filled it with beach glass for the bees to stand on while they’re drinking, so they won’t drown.

Now, we’re ready for our new tenants.

D and his friend went to the city to pick up their nucs of Carniolan bees. Because the bees are coming to a restricted zone, where all bee hives are registered, the breeder has the nuc inspected for hive beetles before they leave her bee yard. The bee breeder simply transfers her 5 frames into the centre of their new hive, making sure that the queen is present.nuc transfer

Then, with all the openings sealed with tape and screen, so the bees don’t wander off while they’re being moved to their new homes, the new hives were put into the bed of our truck, strapped down securely, and covered with a damp drop cloth. D moved his nuc to the bee deck, and smoked the hive to calm the bees down before he released them to do their important work in our yard and all the yards of our neighbourhood. In the photo below, he is adding the food trough; he mixed about 2 litres of 1:1 water:sugar syrup as a starter.  Most bees don’t need to be fed at this time of year, but ours will need a couple of days to get oriented and find their flowers.

The bees lounged around for a few minutes, and then they started exploring. It was exciting!

So much to learn from and about these creatures. Welcome home, bees.

Sharing with: Amaze Me Monday, Rustic & Refined, Backyard Neighbour, Our Home Away From Home, Kathe With an E, Talented Tuesday, Savvy Southern Style, Poofing the Pillows, DIY By Design

6 thoughts on “104. Beekeeping

  1. This is so interesting! I have a friend, her and her husband have done bee keeping for the past couple of years. I love getting my honey from her because I know it’s local and not processed. It helps my husbands allergies.

  2. I think your D is related to my D (aka Mr. Menace) ! We are also new beekeepers and it is fascinating. You are ahead of us with the building of the deck. We are still planning the design of our bee commune. :)
    gwingal

  3. We had bees when I was growing up, but nothing like this. It was interesting to learn the process they use now. Trust no one gets stung.

  4. Getting stung is just part of the process, but these particular bees are known for their gentleness.

  5. Bees are simply fascinating and so vital to our eco system. I love the precious honey they provide and enjoyed reading your post. Have a great week. Thank you for sharing.

  6. Wow! This is incredible! I had no idea they sold kits like this! How fun and also scary… Bees freak me out lol

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