103. Live-edge Slab Bed Construction

This I cannot claim responsibility for (well, I do have some responsibility for giving birth to the person):

But, Tess, the genius behind the bed, has given me permission to share her bed-making process.

And, she did use our tools and reuse some of our collected materials, so I guess you could say we had a small, small hand in it. She used wood and tools that have personal memories and meaning wound through them.bed-labelled copy

At the Christmas holiday, Tess and her partner picked up some well-cured maple slabs at a local supplier, Steve Willgoose Woodworking

Here they are after a bit of cleaning up – debarking, digging out soft areas, some sanding.

Tess’s first order of design was to size and position her bowties. They stabilize the major cracks.

She cut them, mostly on the bandsaw, out of shim wood scavenged from the beach on Haida Gwaii, where she was fortunate to spend a university semester.

Using a drill and Grandpa’s chisels, T routed out the bowtie shapes. When one of the bowties was too small for its setting, she had just enough of the wood left to make another one. Next step was applying copious amounts of wood glue – those little suckers will stay there – and pounding them in with a wood block.

She sanded them down to flush, and sanded the whole slabs to a beautiful smooth surface that we can’t stop stroking. Between the first and second sandings, she raised the grain and the wood fibre with a water-soaked rag, and then let it dry. That made a much smoother surface possible.

T filled the long teardrop-shaped hole with stones collected from Ucluelet and Iceland. She taped them in place from the front with a combination of duct tape and painter’s tape, then turned the slab over to fill the hole with 2-part clear epoxy. A sheet of plastic covered the work table. When she poured in the epoxy, it looked pretty good, but soon we could see that the dam had burst (or should I say “Damn! Burst!”) and the epoxy was leaking out as fast as water. It covered the plastic, and spread onto the front surface of the maple, even started dripping onto the floor.

This turned out to be the most frustrating lesson learned, and she just had to let it cure for a while until it was hard enough to clean up. You don’t want the epoxy all over your hands and clothing – it’s impossible to clean, even with paint thinner. She mopped up with rags as best she could, and then faced the problem again after a sleep.

Once it was firm enough to sand, T sanded the epoxy and the imbedded (NPI – no pun intended) tape off the surface of the wood and stones She had to resort to digging some of it out with sharp instruments, like my 1/2″ belt sander.

I think Tess consulted her brother, who has considerably more experience working with epoxy and wood slabs. He tapes off the hole, then clamps wood tightly against the tape so the epoxy has nowhere to leak. The second pouring of epoxy went better. Here’s a view of it from the back of the headboard, so you can see the light shining through:

She shaped and sanded the elegant bedposts – the headboard posts from a 4 x 4 clear cedar post, and the footboard posts from a beautiful salvaged fir porch post of her grandfather’s.

Using hardwood dowels and glue, T attached the head/footboards to the posts. I didn’t take photos of this step.

The bed rails are made from purchased S4S fir 2x8s with a 1×2 slat ledge screwed to the inside edge. The rails are attached to the posts with hardware from Lee Valley Tools. Here, the assembly crew is checking the bed for square:measure bed for square

The fir slats I salvaged from a former film studio warehouse have hardened with age – they may be 50 years old or more. Tess was commanded to lie down on them to make sure they’re strong enough, but I knew they were, because we used the same ones in our pull-out wall bed in the studio.live edge maple bed

I will transport the bed components to the city, where T will apply the finish and will update with another photo of this beautiful/meaningful project.

I learned so much from watching Tess work. This chronicle leaves out much of the design process and constant figuring and measuring. I am full of admiration for Tess’s skills, and I know she has learned a whole whack of new ones.

 

Sharing with: The Dedicated House, Cozy Little House, Home Stories A to Z

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